PHYSICS 387/389/506  
EXPERIMENTS IN MODERN AND APPLIED PHYSICS
   

mbe

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COURSE INFORMATION
TIME:               MW  3:20-4:40pm
PLACE:            SERIN 133W

HOMEPAGE:  http://www.physics.rutgers.edu/ugrad/389/


INSTRUCTOR
  Prof. Eva Andrei (eandrei-AT-physics.rutgers.edu)
TEACHING ASSISTANT  Phil Rechani (phillipmyinbox@gmail.com)




COURSE OBJECTIVES

The purpose of this course is to acquire hands-on experience in the experimental aspects of modern physics and  to develop an understanding of the relations between experiment and theory. You will carry out  experiments which, when first performed, led to seminal discoveries on the  fundamental laws of physics. In the process you will acquire a set of basic skills essential to becoming a scientist. You will use advanced laboratory equipment to acquire data that probe the laws of physics at atomic and sub-atomic scales. This data  will have the inevitable systematic and random errors that obscure the relations between the macroscopic observables of our sensory experience and the physical laws that govern the microscopic world of atoms and nuclei. You will be challenged to learn how each of the experimental setups works and to master its manipulation so as to obtain the best possible data.  You will learn to carry out data analysis and error estimation and to interpret the data in light of theory. You will acquire the skills to produce credible records of scientific data, and you wil llearn how to disseminate scientific findings through written reports and oral presentations. 

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GUIDELINES - for detailed information click links

o Class schedule. Students will work on experiments in groups of  three, carrying out four experiments during the semester.  Groups and lab schedules will be assigned on the first day of class.
o Laboratory notebook. Obtain your own bound lab notebook.  Each student will be required to keep an individual lab book. Record all data and all procedures in your own lab book no later than before leaving the lab each day.
o Experiment writeups. Obtain the writeup for each experiment from the course webpage
o Preparing for the experiment. Download the preparatory questions and writeup. Read the suggested references or find your own. The preparatory questions often refer to experimental procedures and apparatus. During the first session familiarize yourself with the equipment and start answering the preparatory questions.  In your lab book enter  a summary of objectives and procedures. Submit your answers to the TA by email.You willl  be allowed to start the experiment
only after handing in your answer set.
o In the lab. As a courtesy to the next group
leave your work area at least as  tidy as you found it. Return reference material and tools at the end of each lab.
o Lab report. Each group should submit a lab report to the course instructor, preferrably by email,  for each completed experiment on or before the due date listed on the course schedule The report  should be written in  collaboration with all the lab partners.
o Oral presentation. Following the fourth experiment  each student will make an oral presentation before the entire class .

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COURSE POLICIES AND GRADING (gradebook: 387, 389)

Grading: Grades will be determined by class participation,  preparatory questions, notebook,  lab reports and oral presentation.

Class attendance  is mandatory 


 Class work  
15%
Preparatory questions and homework
20% 
Notebook
10% 
Lab reports            
30% 
Oral presentation   
25% 

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COURSE MATERIALS

 
Textbook: Experiments in Modern Physics, by A.C. Melissinos and J. Napolitano, 2'nd edition          
Available for purchase in University Bookstore.
BOOKS ON RESERVE in the Mathematical Science and Physics Library (Hill center).  Please refer to PHY506 to access the reserved books.

  • Taylor, “Introduction to Error Analysis”
  • Beiser, “Concepts of Modern Physics”
  • Bevington "Data reduction and error analysis for physical sciences"
  • A.C. Melissinos and J. Napolitano "Experiments in Modern Physics"
  • Born and Wolf, “Principles of Optics: electromagnetic theory of propagation, interference and diffraction of light”
  • Eisberg and Resnick, “Quantum Physics of Atoms and Molecules, Nuclei and Particles”
  • M.A. Van Hove,“Surface crystallography by LEED : theory, computation, and structural results”
  • Halliday, Resnick and Walker, “Fundamentals of Physics”

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STUDENTS WITH DISABILITIES:

If you have a disability, you must arrange for me to receive a letter from your College's Disability Concerns Coordinator. A list of the College Coordinators can be found at:

Disabilities Coordinators

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