2010 News

Steve Schnetzer was named this year as a Fellow of the American Physical Society

Steve Schnetzer was named this year as a Fellow of the American Physical Society. The citation reads: "For his work co-founding the AMY detector collaboration, at which he and his student made powerful quantitative tests of quantum chromodynamics, and for his work on experimental particle physics hardware, especially his pioneering work on diamond-based detectors.".

(12/02/2010)

Profile(s): Schnetzer, Stephen

Noemie Koller has been awarded the 2010 Nicholson Medal for Human Outreach

Noemie Koller has been awarded the 2010 Nicholson Medal for Human Outreach. The citation reads "For unselfish commitment to advocating the freedom of scientists around the world and for leadership in fostering equal opportunities for women in science."

More info...

(12/02/2010)

Profile(s): Koller, Noemie

Eugenia Etkina, Professor of Education and member of the Graduate Program of Physics and Astronomy, has won the Science Prize for On-Line Technology Resources of the AAAS

Eugenia Etkina, Professor of Education and member of the Graduate Program of Physics and Astronomy, has won the Science Prize for On-Line Technology Resources of the AAAS, a prize for the best on-line materials in science education.

(11/02/2010)

Profile(s): Etkina, Eugenia

Jack Hughes, Felipe Menanteau and collaborators at the Pontifical Catholic University of Chile have discovered new galaxy clusters revealed by cosmic "shadows"

Their discovery is published in the November 10 issue of the Astrophysics Journal.

(11/01/2010)

Profile(s): Hughes, John P.

Professor Alexander (Sasha) B. Zamolodchikov has won the 2011 Lars Onsager Prize of the American Physical Society

Professor Alexander (Sasha) B. Zamolodchikov has won the 2011 Lars Onsager Prize of the American Physical Society. The citation reads "For outstanding contributions to theoretical physics, and especially for the remarkable ideas that they introduced concerning conformal field theory and soluble models of statistical mechanics in two dimensions."

Sharing the prize were Alexander A. Belavin of the Landau Institute and Alexander M Polyakov of Princeton University

(10/25/2010)

Aresty Center has awarded a travel scholarship to physics senior Sean Yeager

The Aresty Center has awarded a travel scholarship to physics senior Sean Yeager. He is writing his honors thesis on search for supersymmetry under Prof. Sunil Somalwar. Sean has previously received research fellowships from the department as well as the Aresty Center.

(10/25/2010)

Professor Sang-Wook Cheong is coauthor of an article appearing in the October 2010 issue of Physics Today

Professor Sang-Wook Cheong is coauthor of an article appearing in the October 2010 issue of Physics Today entitled Multiferroics: Past, present, and future.

Read the article (subscription required)

(10/21/2010)

Profile(s): Cheong, Sang-Wook

Professor Vitaly Podzorov, postdoctoral researcher Hikmat Najafov, graduate students Bumsu Lee and Qibin Zhou, and Leonard Feldman, director of the Rutgers IAMDN, have been published in Nature Materials

rubrene OFETiProfessor Vitaly Podzorov, along with postdoctoral researcher Hikmat Najafov, graduate students Bumsu Lee and Qibin Zhou, and Leonard Feldman, director of the Rutgers Institute for Advanced Materials, Devices and Nanotechnology (IAMDN), have been published in Nature Materials. Their paper entitled "Observation of long-range exciton diffusion in highly ordered organic semiconductors" discusses a newly discovered property in a material that may lead to efficient and inexpensive plastic solar cells.

(10/11/2010)

Profile(s): Feldman, Leonard C., Podzorov, Vitaly

Professor Philip Batson, with co-PI's Sang Cheong, Fred Cosandey, Jing Li and Ondrei Krivanek have been recognized as one of 100 projects funded by the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act

Professor Philip Batson, with co-PI's Sang Cheong, Fred Cosandey (Materials Science and Engineering), Jing Li (Chemistry and Chemical Biology) and Ondrei Krivanek (Nion Corp.) have been recognized in the report http://www.whitehouse.gov/sites/default/files/100-Recovery-Act-Projects-Changing-America-Report.pdf (project 46) as one of 100 projects funded by the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act which are helping to transform America. The project will make Rutgers a leading university for electron microscopy.

(9/17/2010)

Profile(s): Batson, Philip E., Cheong, Sang-Wook

Professor Vitaly Podzorov has been awarded a prestigious NSF CAREER award

This is the National Science Foundation's most prestigious award in support of early career development activities with special emphasis on integrating research and education. The award provides long term stability (5 years) for young professors. Vitaly received the award in 2009, we apologize for the delayed announcement. This makes this the 10th NSF career award to our department in the past 6th years.

(9/17/2010)

Profile(s): Podzorov, Vitaly

Undergraduate Physics student Edward Lochocki is one of three Rutgers students to win a prestigious Goldwater Scholarship

He is majoring in Physics and Mathematics and is interested in a career in academia.

More info

(9/1/2010)

Professor Jolie Cizewski's recent work with her former postdoc, Kate Jones, now a professor at University of Tennessee, has attracted great notice

They studied the structure of the doubly magic tin-132 nucleus through the addition of a neutron to form tin-133. The results impact on the r-process which produces heavy nuclei in supernova explosions.

The work was published in Nature, one of only a few papers a year from the department to appear in that journal. The work has been described in

(8/10/2010)

Profile(s): Cizewski, Jolie A.

Professor Andrew Baker has been recommended for a prestigious NSF CAREER award

This is the National Science Foundation's most prestigious award in support of early career-development activities with special emphasis on integrating research and education. The award provides long term funding stability (5 years). This is the 9th such award to our department during the past six years.

(8/4/2010)

Profile(s): Baker, Andrew J.

Former Rutgers student Marta Losada, as been elected President of Antonio Narino University, Bogota, Colombia

Dr. Losada received her Ph.D. from Rutgers in 1996, under the supervision of Professor Glennys Farrar.

Professor Chuck Keeton will receive two awards from the University

Professor Chuck Keeton will receive two awards from the University at a reception on May 5, 2010. One of the awards is a Board of Trustees Fellowship for Scholarly Excellence. The other award is a Presidential Award for Teaching Excellence.

Congratulations go out to Chuck for his many wonderful contributions to our department and our university.

Profile(s): Keeton, Charles R.

Board of Governors approved the promotion of Misha Gershenson to Professor II, and Yuri Gershtein and Chuck Keeton to Associate Professors with tenure

At the April 15 meeting, the Board of Governors approved the promotion of Misha Gershenson to Professor II, and Yuri Gershtein and Chuck Keeton to Associate Professors with tenure.
Warmest congratulations to Misha, Yuri and Chuck for these richly deserved promotions!!

Profile(s): Gershenson, Michael, Gershtein, Yuri, Keeton, Charles R.

Professor Andrew Baker will be awarded an SAS Award for Distinguished Contributions to Undergraduate Education

Professor Andrew Baker will be awarded an SAS Award for Distinguished Contributions to Undergraduate Education at a ceremony in the Winants Hall Assembly room in Voorhees Hall at 4 PM on May 4.

Profile(s): Baker, Andrew J.

Professor Eva Andrei will receive the Trustees Award for Excellence in Research

Professor Eva Andrei will receive the Trustees Award for Excellence in Research at a ceremony on May 5, 2010, recognizing her widely known and highly appreciated work on graphene. This award is the university's highest honor for distinguished research contributions. It is the second year in a row that this award goes to our department - Jack Hughes won last year.

Profile(s): Andrei, Eva Y.

Junior physics major Ed Lochocki has won the highly prestigious Barry Goldwater Scholarship

The scholarship is awarded annually to 300 students across the nation, across all of the natural sciences, math, and engineering. For more information, please visit the Barry M. Goldwater Scholarship and Excellence in Education Program website at http://www.act.org/goldwater/.

Professor Yuri Gershtein has been selected to receive a 2010 NSF CAREER award

This is the National Science Foundation's most prestigious award in support of early career-development activities with special emphasis on integrating research and education. The award provides long term funding stability (5 years). This is the 8th such award to our department during the past three years.

Profile(s): Gershtein, Yuri

Andrei Malashevich has won one of the six annual Dean's awards for outstanding research

Andrei Malashevich has won one of the six annual Dean's awards for outstanding research, based on his dissertation "FIRST-PRINCIPLES STUDY OF ELECTRIC POLARIZATION IN PIEZOELECTRIC AND MAGNETOELECTRIC MATERIALS", under the guidance of Professor David Vanderbilt. The award includes a prize of $1000.

Brian Tice was selected to attend the 2010 Nobel Laureate Meeting at Lindau

Brian Tice was selected to attend the 2010 Nobel Laureate Meeting at Lindau June 27-July 2. About 600 students in chemistry, physics, and medicine/physiology are chosen in a world-wide competition. Over 60 Nobel Laureates will attend the meeting to give lectures and meet with the students. Brian is a student of Professor Ron Ransome.

Physics support specialist David Maiullo is featured in Rutgers Magazine

Physics support specialist David Maiullo is featured in Rutgers Magazine. As the author of the article writes: David "takes hard-to-understand scientific principles and creates ways to make audiences sit up and pay attention".

Read more..

Profile(s): Maiullo, David

Assistant professor David Shih has won the DOE Early Career Award

Assistant professor David Shih has won the DOE Early Career Award (the DOE equivalent of the NSF CAREER award) for his proposal: "Supersymmetry Breaking, Gauge Mediation and the LHC".
More information about the Early Career Research Program can be found at the U.S. Department of Energy website.

Profile(s): Shih, David

Physics professor Claud Lovelace ranked 14th according to their system in 1973 and professor David Vanderbilt ranked 13th in 2004

A recent APS Phys Rev E paper, entitled "Diffusion of scientific credits and the ranking of scientists" describes a method for ranking publications and authors, and then compares the system to the assignments of major career awards. The authors discuss that while this ranking system uses the Phys Rev database, it can be applied to other disciplines as well. By visiting http://www.physauthorsrank.org you can enter a name and receive the rank based on their algorithm.

On page 7 of the article two tables show the top 20 scientists ranked according to their method for two years, 1973 and 2004. Rutgers Physics professor Claud Lovelace ranked 14th according to their system in 1973 and professor David Vanderbilt ranked 13th in 2004 on these charts! This provides further evidence of the highly influential work being performed in the department.

Profile(s): Vanderbilt, David

George Horton, Professor II of physics, passed away Nov 1, 2009, at the Robert Wood Johnson hospital in New Brunswick

George had been in poor health for some time, but his death still came as a surprise to his many friends.

George received his Ph D in 1949 at Birmingham University in the UK, under Sir Rudolph Peierls. After doing a post-doc in Zurich, he moved to the University of Alberta in Canada in 1951. In 1960, he came to Rutgers as chair of the physics department at Douglass college. The spring semester 2010 would therefore have been his 100th semester here.

George was a condensed matter theorist with a specialization in lattice dynamics, particularly in strongly anharmonic crystals. As late as in 2003, he still published on this subject. He had a long and lasting impact on the department and on Rutgers. He was a popular and loved teacher and did important work related to the teaching of physics, both locally and on the national scene. He created the Physics Learning Center (now the MSLC), the Gateway program and was very active in forming the AAUP chapter at Rutgers. He was also the central figure in establishing an HMO at Rutgers, which very significantly improved the health benefits for all his colleagues here. He received many honors for his work, such as the Georgina Smith Award from the AAUP "For Creative and Distinguished Leadership", the presidential Award for Distinguished Public Service, the Sussman Award for Excellence in Teaching, Best Teacher of the Year Award and several more.

-Torgny Gustafsson, Physics & Astronomy Chair

Visit Geoge Horton Memorial website

Eva Andrei and colleagues make a ground-breaking discovery!

From the Nature press release:

"Physics: Charge break-up in graphene"

"Researchers confirm that charge carriers in graphene interact strongly with each other and exhibit collective behavior manifesting as fractions of an electron's elementary charge. Graphene is expected to find a range of applications in future electronics and these findings are important for understanding its complex physical properties."

"When charge carriers such as electrons are confined to moving in a two-dimensional plane and subject to a perpendicular magnetic field, they can form new quasi-particles with a fraction of the electron's elementary charge. This is known as the fractional quantum Hall effect FQHE. Graphene could be considered such a perfect two-dimensional system because the carbon atomic constituents are arranged in a single plane. Its charge carriers are remarkably mobile and have been predicted to interact strongly with each other. But firm evidence of collective behavior such as the FQHE has been difficult to obtain."

"Eva Andrei and colleagues report the experimental observation of FQHE using devices containing suspended sheets of graphene probed in a two-terminal measurement set-up. Their approach removes disturbances from impurities that would normally obscure the effects of electron interactions, and may explain why previous searches have failed."

More press releases and news articles:

Science article Physics World article Rutgers Press Release
Eurikalert e!ScienceNews nanowerk
Science Daily Nanotechweb Softpedia
Google News Polish news interia Thaindian News
Profile(s): Andrei, Eva Y.

Daniel Friedan, Professor II and a founding member of the New High Energy Theory Center (NHETC) has won the 2010 Lars Onsager Prize of the American Physical Society

Daniel Friedan, Professor II and a founding member of the New High Energy Theory Center (NHETC) has won the 2010 Lars Onsager Prize of the American Physical Society, one of the most prestigious prizes the APS awards. The citation reads:

For seminal work on the classification and characterization of two-dimensional unitary conformal field theories of critical states

Daniel shares this prize with Steve Shenker of Stanford University. Steve was also a founding member of the NHETC and a member of our faculty until the end of 1998.

Profile(s): Friedan, Daniel

Professor Sang-Wook Cheong is being honored by the American Physical Society with the 2010 James C. McGroddy Prize for New Materials

Professor Sang-Wook Cheong is being honored by the American Physical Society with the 2010 James C. McGroddy Prize for New Materials, one of the most prestigious prizes the APS awards. The citation reads:

For groundbreaking contributions in theory and experiment that have advanced the understanding and utility of multiferroic oxides.

The prize consists of a cash award and a certificate. He shares this prize with Ramamoorthy Ramesh, UC-Berkeley, and Nicola Spaldin, UC-Santa Barbara (Nicola, a theorist, got her start in this field working with Karin Rabe of our department).

Profile(s): Cheong, Sang-Wook